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B*itch, why you cappin' on the gram? - Queen & Berry

Now y’all know we aim for nothing but keeping it 100% real on this blog. But we can’t ignore the fact that we live in a fake world and have to battle that on the daily. Woe is us. It takes effort to keep that realness and be true to yourself. So here at Queen & Berry, we’re here to help you debunk that social media fakeness and how to spot a phony. Thank me later, gurl. I’m here to keep you firmly on the ground, I got you! 

Cappin’? Fake followers? Finsta? What does this all mean!?

Cappin’ – my personal new favorite term. You can’t, not, feel cool when calling someone out with that word. “Bitch, why you cappin’?” Cappin’ means lie. Plain and simple, but when someone adds “no cap” to a sentence, it’s an indicator that they are trying to speak with 100% honesty. 

The term is mostly used in relation to flaunting a fake-rich life and exaggerating one’s social status. Are they showing off that cash? Traveling to crazy destinations all over the globe? Wearing only high-end designer brands? Drinking only Starb’s coffee all day every day and tagging everything #blessed? They are probably cappin’ yo. Beware. 

We all know the REAL rich, like the cray cray rich, the Mark Zuckerberg rich, would never be caught wearing the only designer. The genuine “no cap” wealthy peeps are way less flashy. Bless you, Mark and your boring ass grey t-shirt and baggy jeans uniform.  No shade… but also, no cap. 

Fake followers – I’m gonna blow your mind right now. Kim K does not actually have 159 million followers. She’s cappin’ you could say (see what I did there?). 44% of the contour queen’s followers are fake. She and many other brands have inspired many users craving that same fame, to buy fake followers on Twitter and Instagram to “boost” their social media following. You can quite literally buy hundreds of “real” active Instagram followers all for under $100, or 1,000 Instagram ‘likes’ for $25. Yup. Tea spilled. It’s not real and I’m calling you out, boo! 

How do we know they’re fake cyber bots though? There are a few simple clues. No profile pic? Probs a bot. Spam comments with way too many emojis? Probs a bot. Do they have no followers but are following a bunch of others. You got it. Probs a bot.  

But why would brands do this?! Simple. Get yourself on the popular page, in order to gain real followers. The more exposure you have, the more the real followers will see you and hit that blue follow button. Ba-da-bing-ba-da-boom. Insta famous, baby!

The Finsta – a “Finsta” is a fake Instagram account, aka a “Finstagram”. It’s a safe haven where users can showcase a more natural authentic version of themselves, their in-jokes and the truthful, yet less glamorous aspects of their lives, with a smaller following of family and friends. And actually, this is the kind of “fakeness” I’m here for. I’m a finsta fangirl. 

 We all know Instagram is mostly used as a highlight reel of someone’s life and it can be incredibly inspiring and damaging all at the same time. It’s not typically the place for ugly crying-snort worthy laughter photos, or selfies of you in your sweats, watching reruns of 90-day fiance.  ‘Cause you and I both know your true happy place is your couch. The real “no cap” love of your life. 

So, quite frankly, I say long live the finsta! I’ll happily scroll through pics of your cat looking like an angel in his sleep, I love a good satisfying pimple squeeze and your throwback “hammer time” dance session. I think we could all use a little more real in our lives. And hot dates with our sweatpants and couch. Do it for the (finsta)’gram.

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